NEW YORK – The works of “Transformer: Native Art in Light and Sound” are electric, both literally and figuratively, providing timely expressions of Indigenous worldviews. Contemporary Indigenous art often reflects tradition, but it is commonly misinterpreted to exist solely as part of the past. This exhibition demonstrates the continuing adaptability of tradition to find a place within today’s society. “Transformer” features 10 artists and nine installations that employ a variety of media, including light, digital projection, innovative sound technology and more, to provide thought-provoking and unforgettable experiences composed for the digital age.

Jon Corbett, “Four Generations” ,2015 (video still). Single-channel video (1:30 min.). Collection of the artist. On view beginning Friday, Nov. 10, through Jan. 6, 2019, in Transformer: Native Art in Light and Sound at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, George Gustav Heye Center in New York City, located at One Bowling Green. Museum admission is free. (PRNewsfoto/Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian.)

The exhibition will be open Friday, Nov. 10, through Jan. 6, 2019, in the East Gallery of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, George Gustav Heye Center in New York. A press preview will take place Tuesday, Nov. 7, from 10 a.m. to noon. For more information or to attend, email NMAIPressOffice@si.edu.

The artists showcased in “Transformer” are Jordan Bennett (Mi’kmaq), Raven Chacon (Diné), Jon Corbett (Métis), Marcella Ernest (Ojibwe), Stephen Foster (Haida), Nicholas Galanin (Tlingit/Unangax̂ [Aleut]), Keli Mashburn (Osage), Kevin McKenzie (Cree Métis), Julie Nagam (Anishnawbe/Métis) and Marianne Nicolson (Kwakwa̱ka̱’wakw).

“Native artists are challenging long-held ideas about whether art can be both Native and contemporary,” said Kevin Gover (Pawnee), director of the National Museum of the American Indian. “What speaks loudly in ‘Transformer’ is the idea that nontraditional media and modern form can be embraced by Native artists to build upon traditional Indigenous expression. The artists don’t lose touch with their heritage, yet they set the stage for future adaptation.”

For the full press release and more information about the artists and works of “Transformer,” consult the exhibition press kit at http://s.si.edu/2uvtw8V.

“Transformer: Native Art in Light and Sound” and related programming are made possible through the support of the members of the New York Board of Directors of the National Museum of the American Indian and Ameriprise Financial.

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian
The National Museum of the American Indian, George Gustav Heye Center is located in the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House at One Bowling Green in New York City. For additional information, visit AmericanIndian.si.edu. Follow the museum via social media on FacebookTwitter and Instagram.

 


SOURCE Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

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